Home Life How to Care for a Dachshund

How to Care for a Dachshund

by Kevin

Introduction

The dachshund (pronounced DAK-sund) is a dog breed having shorter legs and a longer back than the majority of dog breeds. The dachshund is a German hunting dog that originated in Germany. (The word “dachshund” means “badger dog” in German.) To properly care for your dachshund, you must be aware of their unique requirements, especially their proclivity for intervertebral disc illness. Helping your dachshund maintain a healthy weight, grooming them, and teaching them appropriate manners are all part of caring for them. Continue reading to find out more about how to care for your dachshund.

Back Protection for Your Dachshund

Intervertebral disc disease is a common problem in dachshunds (IVDD). Dachshunds, like other tiny dog breeds, have an increased chance of developing intervertebral disc disease. The padding between your dachshund’s vertebrae breaks or bulges out in IVDD, causing the vertebrae to be stressed. IVDD can result in discomfort, difficulty with bladder control, and possibly paralysis. Certain steps must be taken to assist lower your dachshund’s risk of having IVDD. You should also be able to detect the signs of IVDD in your dachshund so you can figure out whether there is a problem. If you detect any of the following signs, contact your dachshund’s veterinarian right away:

  • decrease in activity level (no longer leaping or running)
  • having difficulty standing
  • wailing in agony
  • Anxiety, nervousness, and a change in behavior
  • hunching the back and neck and/or tensing the muscles in the back and neck
  • consuming fewer calories or none at all
  • bladder and/or bowel control issues [1]

Maintain a healthy weight for your dachshund. Being overweight puts your dachshund at a considerably higher chance of having IVDD, so make sure he gets enough of activity and eats well. Stand over your dachshund and glance down to see whether he’s at a healthy weight. If his ribs are visible, he is underweight and needs to put on some weight. If you can feel his ribs when you touch his sides but can’t see them, he’s a healthy weight. He’s overweight if you can’t see or feel his ribs. Instead of a drooping tummy, your dachshund should have a tapered waist. [2]

  • Consult your veterinarian about how much weight he needs to gain or drop. Your veterinarian may also advise you on how much to feed your dachshund in order to keep him at a healthy weight.
  • Every day, take your dachshund for a walk and play with him.
  • Treats should be given in moderation.
  • If your dachshund grows too overweight, consider feeding him a weight-maintenance meal.

Find out how to properly hold your dachshund. Holding your dachshund in the proper manner can also safeguard his back. To hold your dachshund, lay one hand under his belly to support his back and another hand behind his back to support his rear end. Before you hold your dachshund, you might want to practice with something light.

  • Never pick up your dachshund with only one hand, or by the paws or the head.

Assist your dachshund with ascending and descending stairs. Climbing stairs puts strain on your dachshund’s spine, which might lead to IVDD over time. Typical stairwells are too high for dachshunds to climb without straining their backs. If you want your dachshund to come upstairs or downstairs, you should always carry him. [3]

  • Install a baby gate to prevent your dachshund from climbing the stairs.
  • Consider ramps for any tiny steps that your dachshund must use on a daily basis.[4]

Avoid allowing your dachshund to jump on furniture or other high areas. Jumping also puts a lot of strain on your dachshund’s spine, perhaps increasing his risk of IVDD. Allowing your dachshund to jump up on high locations, such as the sofa or your bed, can reduce this risk element. Lift your dachshund into your lap yourself if you want him to. Encourage him not to get up.

  • If you want your dachshund to be able to get onto furniture when you aren’t there, consider acquiring some furniture ramps.[5]

When walking your dachshund, use a harness. If your dachshund pulls when you take him for a walk, he is putting extra strain on his vertebrae, which might lead to IVDD. Using a harness instead of a collar to attach your dachshund’s leash will assist to relieve stress on his neck and avoid another cause of IVDD. [6]

Your Dachshund’s Training

Shorten your training sessions. Train your dachshund every day for three five-minute sessions for the greatest results. Your dachshund will be more attentive if you keep training sessions brief. The periodicity will assist your dachshund remember what you want him to learn. [7]

Recognize and reward positive conduct. You must reinforce your dachshund’s excellent behavior as soon as he performs it in order to persuade him to do what you desire. If you ask your dachshund to sit and he does so, immediately reward him with praise and caressing to let him know he did a good job. You should praise and treat your dachshund anytime he does well so that he understands that these are the traits you appreciate. [8]

Ignore inappropriate behavior. By simply ignoring poor behavior or withholding the incentive, you assist your dachshund realize what you don’t want him to do. If your dachshund wants to go for a walk but is dashing around the house because he is eager, ignore him and wait until he stops before putting on his leash. Put on his harness and take him for a stroll when he comes to a complete stop. Every time you take your dachshund for a walk, do this to assist him understand what you don’t want him to do. He’ll discover that running does not lead to walking, but that standing still does. [9]

Consider working with a professional dog trainer who is qualified. Consider hiring someone to assist you in training your dachshund if you’re having difficulties getting him to obey your orders. Your dachshund may be trained with the aid of a licensed professional dog trainer. This might be especially useful if you’re having trouble changing harmful habits. [10]

  • If you’d want to give your dachshund some socializing, you might seek for group training sessions in your region.

Taking Care of Your Dachshund

Your dog should be washed. Wash your dachshund with a special dog shampoo. Once every three months, give your dog a wash if he or she has short hair. You may need to bathe your dog more regularly if she has lengthy hair. Wet your dog’s fur with a spray hose, but avoid the regions around her eyes, ears, and nose. The shampoo should next be massaged into your dog’s coat. Rinse off all of the shampoo and pat her dry with a towel. [11]

  • After each bath, lavish praise and a reward on your dachshund to teach him link bath time with pleasant things.

Brush your dachshund using a dachshund brush. You may only need to brush your dachshund once a week if he has short hair. To avoid tangled and matted fur, brush your dachshund on a regular basis if he has long hair. Before going on to a brush, use a broad comb to to loosen knots. Make sure to lavish praise on your dog while brushing him and reward him with a treat after you’re done so that he equates brushing with positive experiences. [12]

Your dog’s nails should be trimmed. You’ll need a specific dog nail clipper to trim your dachshund’s nails. You can get one from a pet store. Before you attempt to cut your dachshund’s nails, you may need to get him comfortable to you handling his nails. If your dachshund is hesitant of you handling his feet and nails, start by patting his feet and touching his toes to get him acclimated to it. When he lets you touch his toes, give him praise and a treat. You might attempt clipping his nails when he gets used to you touching his feet. [13]

  • Make sure you don’t cut too deep or you’ll end up cutting the quick of his nail. This is an extremely sensitive spot that may bleed.
  • If you’re worried about injuring your dog while clipping his nails, consult your veterinarian for instructions or hire a professional groomer to do it for you.

Examine for flaws. Checking your dog for fleas, ticks, and other potential health issues around grooming time is a smart idea. Make careful to look for any strange growths, sores, or painful places on your dog’s skin. Check your dog’s ears for excessive wax buildup and bad odors as well. If you see anything out of the ordinary, make an appointment with your veterinarian right away. [14]

Warnings

  • Dogs that aren’t used to being around people or other dogs may bark, snarl, or bite. From an early age, socialize your dachshund with other dogs and humans, and continue to do so throughout his life.
  • Consider purchasing pet health insurance. Dachshunds may be brave and courageous, which can lead them into difficulty and force them to choose between surgery and euthanasia.
  • Allowing your dachshund to get overweight can lead to serious back and health issues.
  • Because dachshund nails are black, clipping them should be done with caution. Make an effort not to collide with the swift (blood vessel in the nail).

References

  1. Slipped Disc, Bad Back, And Muscle Spasms In Dogs | PetMD. (2009, July 15). Slipped Disc, Bad Back, and Muscle Spasms in Dogs | PetMD. http://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/neurological/c_dg_intervertebral_disc_disease?page=show.
  2. How Can You Tell If Your Pet Is Overweight? | PetMD. (2012, September 25). How Can You Tell If Your Pet Is Overweight? | PetMD. http://www.petmd.com/dog/nutrition/evr_multi_is_my_pet_fat_overweight.
  3. Avoiding IVDD And Back Problems In Dachshunds | NorthStar VETS. (2013, May 10). Avoiding IVDD and back problems in Dachshunds | NorthStar VETS. http://www.northstarvets.com/blog/ask-the-northstar-vets-vet-avoiding-back-problems-in-dachshunds/.
  4. Slipped Disc, Bad Back, And Muscle Spasms In Dogs | PetMD. (2009, July 15). Slipped Disc, Bad Back, and Muscle Spasms in Dogs | PetMD. http://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/neurological/c_dg_intervertebral_disc_disease?page=show.
  5. Slipped Disc, Bad Back, And Muscle Spasms In Dogs | PetMD. (2009, July 15). Slipped Disc, Bad Back, and Muscle Spasms in Dogs | PetMD. http://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/neurological/c_dg_intervertebral_disc_disease?page=show.
  6. Slipped Disc, Bad Back, And Muscle Spasms In Dogs | PetMD. (2009, July 15). Slipped Disc, Bad Back, and Muscle Spasms in Dogs | PetMD. http://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/neurological/c_dg_intervertebral_disc_disease?page=show.
  7. Ramsey, Ph.D., D. H. (2021, May 21). How To Train Your Dachshund: From Basic Tips To Advanced Methods – DachWorld.com. DachWorld.com. http://www.dachworld.com/howtotrain.htm.
  8. Dog Care | Grooming | Nutrition | Disease | Behavior | ASPCA. (n.d.). ASPCA. https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/training-your-dog.
  9. Dog Care | Grooming | Nutrition | Disease | Behavior | ASPCA. (n.d.). ASPCA. https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/training-your-dog.
  10. Dog Care | Grooming | Nutrition | Disease | Behavior | ASPCA. (n.d.). ASPCA. https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/training-your-dog.
  11. Dog Grooming Tips | ASPCA. (n.d.). ASPCA. https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/dog-care/groom-your-dog.
  12. Dog Grooming Tips | ASPCA. (n.d.). ASPCA. https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/dog-care/groom-your-dog.
  13. Dog Grooming Tips | ASPCA. (n.d.). ASPCA. https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/dog-care/groom-your-dog.
  14. Dog Grooming Tips | ASPCA. (n.d.). ASPCA. https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/dog-care/groom-your-dog.

You may also like

Navhow is dedicated to teaching people all over the world how to do anything.

 

Subscribe

The Best How-To Newsletter Anywhere

©2022 Navhow, All Right Reserved