Home Life How to Keep Pets from Ruining Your Furniture

How to Keep Pets from Ruining Your Furniture

by Kevin

Introduction

Pets are great friends that can transform any environment into a home. Pets, on the other hand, might grow territorial about certain pieces of furniture or leave shed hair all over your freshly vacuumed sofa or bed. It’s critical to train your pet to keep off the furniture when these issues develop. Learning how to break these undesirable behaviors can assist you in permanently training your pets to keep off the furniture.

Providing Different Options

Get a nice bed for your pet. You’ll need to provide a comfy alternative for your dog or cat before you can teach them to stop sleeping on the sofa or bed. If you don’t give an alternative, you’ll undoubtedly have a hard time keeping your pet off the furniture. [1] In fact, owing to arthritic pain or discomfort from resting on the floor, some dogs are better suited sleeping on soft furniture. [2] A dog or cat bed may assist create a pleasant sleeping environment for your pet without giving you any hassle.

Get a condo for your cat. If your cat is always climbing on furniture and giving you difficulties, a cat condo is one of the greatest options you can provide him. Cat condos are multi-level buildings in which cats may climb, leap, and sleep in one of the “rooms” or platforms. These indoor constructions provide your cat with a comfortable place to sleep as well as opportunities to climb and exercise. [3]

One piece of furniture should be set aside for pets. Consider designating one piece of furniture as a pet-friendly spot if your pet isn’t content with sleeping in a dog or cat bed. It might be an old armchair or a love seat that you no longer use, or anything else that your pet would like. It’s critical, though, to remind your pet that he can’t climb on other items of furniture.

  • Some animals may struggle to grasp why one piece of furniture is OK while others aren’t, particularly at first. Consistency is the key. When your pet attempts to climb up onto a piece of “people only” furniture, take him away from it and place him in his allotted chair.

Treats may be used as a motivator. Once you’ve given your pet an alternate, “pet-friendly” piece of furniture, you’ll probably need to teach them to use it instead of the humans-only furniture. Treats may be quite helpful in this situation. Treats may be left on the dog/cat bed, in the cat condo, or on the pet-friendly piece of furniture to make them more appealing to your pet. [4] If your pet wants to climb onto a piece of furniture reserved for people, force them off and place a reward onto the furniture or bedding you’ve supplied for them.

At night, crate or confine your pet. If your dog or cat continues attempting to get into your bed at night, you might consider crate training or limiting your pet to another room. Closing your door and keeping them out of your room may be sufficient if you equip your pet with a comfortable bed or blanket to sleep on in the crate or room they are confined to.

From the outset, limit your pet’s access. If you’ve just brought home a new pet or intend to do so soon, it’s advisable to limit your pet’s access to furniture from the start if being on the furniture is a problem for you. It will be much more difficult (though not impossible) to stop this habit after your pet has learned that being on the couch/chair/bed is okay, so preventing this behavior from the start is critical.

Making Furniture Look Unattractive

Food should be kept away from the furnishings. Your dog may get on the sofa since they know you eat there, and there may be crumbs in the cushions. Perhaps your cat climbs on the kitchen counter because they know you sometimes put their food dish up there. It’s possible that whatever piece of furniture your pet is climbing on has been associated with food. Keep food away from the furniture you’re training your pet to avoid, and clean up any messes you create on or near it as soon as possible. [5]

Double-sided tape should be used. Making the furniture less comfy is one approach to educate your pet to avoid using it (and to keep it off even while you’re not home). Purchase some inexpensive place mats and use double-sided scotch tape to cover one side. The sticky mats may then be placed, adhesive side up, on whichever countertops or sofa cushions your pet is attracted to, or double-sided tape can be applied directly to the furniture. The sticky feeling will be quite unpleasant for your pet, but it will not injure him or her, and it will not damage your furniture if you use place mats. [6]

Make use of aluminum foil. Another cheap furniture deterrent is aluminum foil, which makes furniture noisy and unpleasant, and hence unappealing, without killing your pet or causing damage to your furniture. Using aluminum foil sheets, cover sofas, chairs, and counter surfaces. An upside-down plastic carpet runner may also be used to cover your sofa and chair cushions.

Furniture shouldn’t be accessible. Placing other furniture, such as folding chairs, over the cushions is an easy method to keep dogs off your sofas and recliners. This will eliminate any temptation by making the furniture inaccessible to your pet, but it will still be easy to remove when you want to sit on the sofa or chair. [7]

Make a soft booby trap. Laying a mild trap is one approach to teach your pet not to climb onto furniture, particularly while you’re not home. Stacking empty soda cans on the furniture is an excellent example of an innocuous (but powerful) booby trap. To avoid sticky residue on your furniture, make sure the empty cans are thoroughly cleaned. You may make a little pyramid out of a sofa cushion or the headrest atop an armchair, and if your pet attempts to climb it, the tumbling cans will scare him away from the furniture. It may scare him enough that he will remain off the furniture indefinitely. [8]

Invest in a deterrent device. There are a variety of commercially available furniture deterrent devices on the market if you don’t want to make your own furniture blockers. The Snappy Trainer is made out of a huge paddle connected to a sensitive trigger that detects when an animal climbs onto a sofa or chair cushion and causes the whole gadget to snap up in the air. If your pet crosses the motion sensor while climbing onto your furniture, the SSSCAT, another motion-activated gadget, fires a blast of air at them. The Sofa Saver is a gadget that you place across your sofa, and if your pet gets on it, it sounds a loud alarm, scaring your pet away. Each of these gadgets has the potential to be quite useful since they startle your pet without causing injury and may be used even while you are not at home. [9]

The Off Command is being taught

Keep an eye on your pet on the sofa. Though very successful, the off command necessitates your presence and observation of your pet climbing onto off-limits furniture. This method is more effective with dogs than with cats since dogs react better to spoken instructions. Rather of physically removing your dog from a couch or chair he isn’t meant to be on (which may evoke an angry response from him), teach him the “off” command. [10]

Give a treat and say “Off.” As soon as you see your dog on the sofa or chair, say, “Off,” in a calm but firm voice. Then, holding a tiny reward in front of their face, carefully draw the treat away from the sofa or chair and down to the floor with your dog’s nose in tow. [11]

Reward your dog and do it again. Give your dog vocal praise and the reward you lured them away with as soon as they get down off the furniture. Give your pet goodies every time they climb down at first, then progressively reduce the frequency of treats by using the “off” command. You should eventually be able to instruct your dog to leave the furniture by simply saying, “Off.” [12]

Alternative Strategies to Consider

Increase the amount of exercise your pet receives. Your cat may be climbing on furniture because he or she isn’t receiving enough exercise and excitement on a regular basis. If you can’t afford a cat condo, purchase them a scratching post and some interactive toys that they can chase, run, and leap with. This should exhaust them, decreasing the need for them to climb, scratch, and investigate your furnishings. [13]

Chemical deterrents should be used. Anything that smells or tastes like citrus or bitter apple is naturally repulsive to cats and dogs. [14] You may take advantage of this while training your pet to remain off countertops and furniture. Use citrus-scented cleaning products to keep cats off your countertops, or spritz a little citrus-scented oil or bitter apple on your furniture to keep pets away. (Just be careful not to harm your furniture by misting oil extracts on the pillows!) These odors repel both dogs and cats, and if you make specific environmental items smell like these disagreeable aromas, they will stay away. [15]

Conceal or crate your pet. Consider obtaining a box for your dog while you’re not home, or restricting your pet(s) to a specific area, such as a bathroom or kitchen, if your pet climbs on furniture when you’re not home (as demonstrated by lots of hair or scratch marks on furniture). [16] Baby gates may also be used to restrict access to certain rooms or items of furniture. [17] No matter where you keep your animals, make sure they have access to food and fresh, clean water, and that they aren’t exposed to extreme temperatures.

Warnings

  • Although double-sided tape is quite useful, keep in mind that it will get very filthy very soon. The tape will need to be changed on a regular basis. Tape may also be tough to remove off furniture, particularly if it’s constructed of wood.
  • Never scold your pet if he or she climbs on your furniture. Your furniture is made to be comfy, and your pet just wants to be comfortable as well. It will only confuse and terrify your pet if you scream at him for trying to join you on the sofa. Rather of screaming or punishing him, providing him with a comfortable, pet-friendly alternative will be much more beneficial.

References

  1. Dog Training: How To Keep Dogs Off Furniture. (n.d.). Vetstreet. http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/3-steps-to-keeping-your-dog-off-the-furniture.
  2. 10 Ways To Help an Arthritic Dog. (n.d.). Vetstreet. http://www.vetstreet.com/care/10-ways-to-help-an-arthritic-dog.
  3. Cat Exercise | How To Exercise Your Cat | Cat Exercise Ideas. (n.d.). Vetstreet. http://www.vetstreet.com/cats/cat-exercise-keeping-your-kitty-in-good-shape.
  4. Dog Training: How To Keep Dogs Off Furniture. (n.d.). Vetstreet. http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/3-steps-to-keeping-your-dog-off-the-furniture.
  5. Keeping Your Cat Off the Counter | Animal Humane Society. (n.d.). Animal Humane Society. http://www.animalhumanesociety.org/training/how-do-i-keep-my-cat-counter.
  6. Keeping Your Cat Off the Counter | Animal Humane Society. (n.d.). Animal Humane Society. http://www.animalhumanesociety.org/training/how-do-i-keep-my-cat-counter.
  7. Keep Your Dog Off the Couch | Modern Dog Magazine. (n.d.). Modern Dog magazine. http://moderndogmagazine.com/articles/keep-your-dog-couch/390.
  8. Keep Your Dog Off the Couch | Modern Dog Magazine. (n.d.). Modern Dog magazine. http://moderndogmagazine.com/articles/keep-your-dog-couch/390.
  9. Cat Care | Grooming | Nutrition | Disease | Behavior | ASPCA. (n.d.). ASPCA. https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/cat-behavior/keeping-your-cat-countertops-and-tables.
  10. Dog Training: How To Keep Dogs Off Furniture. (n.d.). Vetstreet. http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/3-steps-to-keeping-your-dog-off-the-furniture.
  11. Dog Training: How To Keep Dogs Off Furniture. (n.d.). Vetstreet. http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/3-steps-to-keeping-your-dog-off-the-furniture.
  12. Dog Training: How To Keep Dogs Off Furniture. (n.d.). Vetstreet. http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/3-steps-to-keeping-your-dog-off-the-furniture.
  13. Keeping Your Cat Off the Counter | Animal Humane Society. (n.d.). Animal Humane Society. http://www.animalhumanesociety.org/training/how-do-i-keep-my-cat-counter.
  14. Cat Repellents. (n.d.). http://cals.arizona.edu/yavapai/anr/hort/byg/archive/catrepellents.html.
  15. Maddie’s® Shelter Medicine Program | Cornell University College Of Veterinary Medicine. (n.d.). Maddie’s® Shelter Medicine Program | Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. http://www.sheltermedicine.vet.cornell.edu/documents/CorrectingUnwantedBehaviorinYourCat.pdf.
  16. Dominik Feichtner. Dog Trainer & Behaviorist. Expert Interview. 18 March 2021
  17. Dog Training: How To Keep Dogs Off Furniture. (n.d.). Vetstreet. http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/3-steps-to-keeping-your-dog-off-the-furniture.

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